OJDLA https://ojdla.com/ en-US Wed, 07 Dec 2022 11:24:55 -0500 Wed, 07 Dec 2022 11:24:55 -0500 Online versus Face-to-Face Nursing Degrees: A Study of Recruiters’ Perceptions https://ojdla.com/articles/online-versus-face-to-face-nursing-degrees-a-study-of-recruiters-perceptions Thu, 15 Sep 2022 10:45:00 -0400 Julie Stone Ingle https://ojdla.com/articles/online-versus-face-to-face-nursing-degrees-a-study-of-recruiters-perceptions Since the 1990s, online learning and distance learning have proliferated rapidly. The purpose of this study was to explore recruiters' perceptions regarding nurses with online degrees versus face-to-face (f2f) degrees at the baccalaureate level. This study used a qualitative research approach with a phenomenological research design. A total of ten nurse recruiters were recruited to participate in online Zoom interviews. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the findings. Eight themes representing recruiters' perceptions regarding nurses with online degrees versus f2f degrees at the baccalaureate level emerged from the qualitative data. Participants perceived that the nurses with online degrees tended to be technologically savvy, had critical thinking skills, and could accomplish tasks autonomously. Participants had different perceptions regarding the advantages of online education based on their own experiences of taking online classes.

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Adaptive Advising Through Text Messaging: Adviser Motives and Institutional Support for Texting Students https://ojdla.com/articles/adaptive-advising-through-text-messaging-adviser-motives-and-institutional-support-for-texting-students Thu, 15 Sep 2022 10:30:00 -0400 Julie Stone Ingle https://ojdla.com/articles/adaptive-advising-through-text-messaging-adviser-motives-and-institutional-support-for-texting-students This study explored academic advisor use and perceptions of values, motives, and institutional support of SMS texting as a communication channel with students. Theoretical concepts in Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and adaptive leadership guided the study as well as existing survey research on Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) in higher education (Duran et al., 2005). Survey responses from advisors nationwide (N = 402) revealed SMS use among all ages, genders, experience levels, and programmatic formats, and advisors overall had a positive view of the communication channel. Motives for use varied between online and on-ground academic advisers, with SMS used primarily to gain access to richer mediums. A statistically significant association between learning environment and SMS incorporation indicated that online advisors were likelier to use SMS texting for student communication. The study sheds light on the prevalence of SMS use by academic advisers and how institutional policies and resources might better support the university-to-student connection. For HEIs interested in enabling adaptive advising to experiment with interventions at scale and relationship building in student-centric mediums, the findings may help to provide a framework for using SMS text as an additional channel for communication.

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For-Profit Online Performance through the COVID-19 Pandemic https://ojdla.com/articles/for-profit-online-performance-through-the-covid-19-pandemic Thu, 15 Sep 2022 10:16:00 -0400 Julie Stone Ingle https://ojdla.com/articles/for-profit-online-performance-through-the-covid-19-pandemic The COVID-19 pandemic has had substantial impacts on all types of higher education institutions. The common thought is that the shift to online would be a benefit to existing online education providers. This paper examines the market as a whole, as well as the performance of publicly-traded online higher education providers against the market index of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, with the goal of identifying whether or not online providers were able to take advantage of the market conditions to exceed the performance of the market as a whole. Coupled with this investigation is the phenomenon of public institutions acquiring for-profit online providers and the implications of that emerging trend to the higher education market as a whole.

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FLOC, Facilitating Learning Online Certification Workshop Part of the Micro-Credential series for online teaching certification https://ojdla.com/articles/floc-facilitating-learning-online-certification-workshop-part-of-the-micro-credential-series-for-online-teaching-certification Thu, 15 Sep 2022 09:12:00 -0400 Julie Stone Ingle https://ojdla.com/articles/floc-facilitating-learning-online-certification-workshop-part-of-the-micro-credential-series-for-online-teaching-certification The pandemic has changed the way we look at our professional development opportunities. UNG’s Distance Education & Technology Integration (DETI) made the decision to completely revamp our professional development options. In 2012 we first developed a self-paced fully online workshop to onboard new online/hybrid faculty quickly and efficiently. The Facilitating Learning Online Certification (FLOC) is a standalone self-paced workshop and is popular among our new hires as well as seasoned faculty. This presentation outlines the way we have incorporated FLOC into a new “menu” of professional development opportunities. Rather than a certificate for successfully completing individual workshops, now each workshop is awarded a micro-credential (badge), which when combined, cultivate to our UNG Online Teaching Certification.

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Using Feedforward to Improve the Course Redesign-Relaunch Process https://ojdla.com/articles/using-feedforward-to-improve-the-course-redesign-relaunch-process Wed, 15 Jun 2022 08:05:00 -0400 Julie Stone Ingle https://ojdla.com/articles/using-feedforward-to-improve-the-course-redesign-relaunch-process The wash-rinse-repeat model of refreshing courses each term might be a financially beneficial model for the institution, yet is it serving students the best educational experience? If all that is monitored in the pre-flight check is for broken hyperlinks and refreshed dates, who is ensuring the quality delivery? Many institutions proudly boast “excellence in teaching”, “student success”, “engaged learning”, and “student-centered” in mission, vision, and value statements, yet once an online course is launched, the oversight of that course often appears to go on autopilot in some institutions for years.

Course design is an iterative process with feedforward loops like student course reviews, peer observations, course grades, and self-reflections to name a few. The process might involve a SWOT-style analysis including course challenges students identify, opportunities for improvement from peers, and reflection on course goals to capture all input. Instructional designers are key stakeholders in the process for information about campus resources, educational technology, and accessing reports from the learning management system from previous courses to study student performance or course page usage.

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Interactive Videos: Student Perceptions Before and After the Great Pivot https://ojdla.com/articles/interactive-videos-student-perceptions-before-and-after-the-great-pivot Wed, 15 Jun 2022 08:04:00 -0400 Julie Stone Ingle https://ojdla.com/articles/interactive-videos-student-perceptions-before-and-after-the-great-pivot The purpose of this study was to survey undergraduate students of a management statistics course about their perceptions on the usefulness of a series of instructional videos with embedded quiz questions created by their instructor to provide students with knowledge of Excel functions needed to understand the course materials and complete course work. Due to COVID-19, the intended study was split between academic years and three different course types (in-person pre-COVID-19, fully-online post-COVID-19, in-person post-COVID-19), all taught by the same instructor, were surveyed resulting in a study that compared three different course types rather than a simple replication study. The results of the survey showed that there were significant positive changes to perceptions of video quizzing usefulness for students as they progressed through the in-person pre-COVID-19 course, but not significant differences for students who progressed through the two other course. In comparing the courses with each other, the only area in which all three had significant differences to each other was in students feeling the video quizzes enabled them to skip synchronous sessions. This was the only area in which the pre-COVID 19 course had any significant differences from the two post-COVID-19 courses, but the two post-COVID-19 courses were found to be significantly different from each other on almost every item with the fully-online students rating all items higher than the in-person students did. The researchers of this study felt that these results pointed to two major areas for future study; one being on how class modality post-COVID-19 impacts student perceptions of online tools and the other being related to the value and replicability of the in-person experience among those who were forced into remote learning during the pandemic.

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An Early Use of Badging by The Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle (CLSC) https://ojdla.com/articles/an-early-use-of-badging-by-the-chautauqua-literary-and-scientific-circle-clsc Wed, 15 Jun 2022 08:03:00 -0400 Julie Stone Ingle https://ojdla.com/articles/an-early-use-of-badging-by-the-chautauqua-literary-and-scientific-circle-clsc The history of educational badging is incomplete without mentioning the visionary work of the founders and distance learning administrators of the Chautauqua Institution in 1874 and, more specifically, the Chautauqua Literary Scientific Circle (CLSC) in 1878. The CLSC is one of the oldest continuous distance learning programs in the United States and has, from its founding to the present, incorporated a number of badges—known by its founders as “features” and “devices”— to acknowledge progress and completion of its participants as a cohort or community of distant learners, of which many would never meet in person. The following badges (known as “features” and “devices”) used by CLSC administrators are identified and described: badge, class name, motto, Memorial Days, flower, button or pin, song, yell, banner, banner pole, certificate, diploma, mosaic, seal, guild, and stole.

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Show Me! Do Videos Make a Difference in an Asynchronous Online Course? https://ojdla.com/articles/show-me-do-videos-make-a-difference-in-an-asynchronous-online-course Wed, 15 Jun 2022 08:02:00 -0400 Julie Stone Ingle https://ojdla.com/articles/show-me-do-videos-make-a-difference-in-an-asynchronous-online-course This study attempted to determine if placing videos in an asynchronous course influenced the learning experience. Data were examined for an introductory college statistics course comparing results pre and post implementation of videos in support of discussions, assignments, homework, quizzes, and exams. Frequency of external tutoring was significantly reduced (40%) for the course sections that included embedded videos. This finding supports the idea that videos reduced the amount of friction or extraneous cognitive load experienced by students since using tutoring resources external to the course requires additional time and effort on the part of students and tutors. A significant majority of students agreed or strongly agreed that the videos helped them understand course concepts and how to perform course calculations. A significant majority of students also felt that course videos improved their knowledge of Microsoft Excel. However, there was not enough evidence found to support the idea that videos improved student grades or reduced tutoring time for those students who required it. Recommendations for future research includes repeating this study methodology accounting for gender, age, and ethnicity. Additionally, the methodology used in this study should be used in both traditional and non-traditional college settings.

Purpose

STEM courses are sometimes seen as barrier classes for students because they have a higher perceived cognitive load. STEM courses typically deal with different types of software to enhance the learning process. However, course concepts can get “lost” for some students who struggle with the tools used to solve problems. Extraneous (unnecessary) cognitive load (also known as “friction”) encountered by students who need to use unfamiliar software leads to course withdraws or less than optimal performance. Online courses have the additional aspect of being asynchronous. One of the challenges posed by distance learning is instructional presence. Videos can be used to address issues posed in STEM courses such as extraneous cognitive load and (lack of) instructional presence by explaining concepts and demonstrating procedures needed for students to be successful. The purpose of this study was to determine if embedded course videos could improve the learning experience in any meaningful way.

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Helping Instructors Support Students Independent of Grading and Providing Feedback. https://ojdla.com/articles/helping-instructors-support-students-independent-of-grading-and-providing-feedback Wed, 15 Jun 2022 08:01:00 -0400 Julie Stone Ingle https://ojdla.com/articles/helping-instructors-support-students-independent-of-grading-and-providing-feedback Unbundling faculty roles has been a trending topic in higher education for many years. One unbundling method BYU-Idaho Online Learning is exploring, is unbundling instruction and mentoring from assessment. This model has freed up more time for faculty outreach to students, led to greater job-satisfaction for our online adjunct faculty and teaching assistants, promoted greater consistency in assessment across course sections, and facilitated faster turnaround times for scoring students' work. These outcomes, however, have not come without substantial planning and training. This paper seeks to describe the work being carried out with online faculty to help them understand and thrive within this new, unbundled role.

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Sense of Community in Synchronous and Asynchronous Online Courses: Perceptions and Experiences of Nontraditional Students https://ojdla.com/articles/sense-of-community-in-synchronous-and-asynchronous-online-courses-perceptions-and-experiences-of-nontraditional-students Tue, 15 Mar 2022 11:57:00 -0400 Jesse Brewer https://ojdla.com/articles/sense-of-community-in-synchronous-and-asynchronous-online-courses-perceptions-and-experiences-of-nontraditional-students Developing a sense of community (SoC) in college is vital due to its positive impacts on learning and student success. In this study, the researchers examine students’ perceptions of SoC in synchronous and asynchronous online courses, with specific interest in the experiences of regional campus students who are often considered to be nontraditional. Study participants were enrolled in small business management programs offered on the regional campuses of a public Midwestern university. Participants’ perspectives on the importance of connecting with others in college varied, specifically concerning connecting with other students. However, there was more agreement on the importance of connecting with course instructors. Additionally, participants reported differences in their perceptions and expectations of developing SoC in synchronous versus asynchronous online courses. Web conferencing and games were perceived to have positive impacts on SoC development, while there was a negative perception of the impact of discussion forums.

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